marriage equality

Kim Davis, Smoking, and Spoiled Children

I’m a few days behind on the times, it seems, since I don’t read a lot of American news in Spain, but I did just finish reading up a little on the Kim Davis situation and just wanted to give my take really quickly, because I do plan on keeping up with this blog (both fun Spain things and things like this) while I’m gone. In case anyone reading isn’t super familiar with the situation, what’s happening is basically this: a county clerk (or something along the lines of that; she’s a government employee, which is the point) was taken into custody earlier this week for refusing to issue marriage licenses following the Supreme Court ruling earlier this summer. Her defense was that her religious convictions prevented her from participating in or facilitating sin, and she now faces greater charges and possibly prison time. Needless to say, people have gotten pretty riled up on both sides of this debate.

My take?

Well, actually, my initial reaction to this whole entire thing was sadness. I obviously don’t know Kim Davis, but I’m sure that she’s actually a really nice lady, even though she’s sort of refusing to do her job (which the government pays her for by the way) right now, which isn’t okay. But what occurred to me secondly was this: I think that a lot of Christians are still really confused about how they’re supposed to navigate situations like this, and I think that confusion and lack of understanding causes them to create situations in which there appears to be a great deal of animosity between Christians and LGBT people. And right now, my prayer is that we would learn quickly so that conflicts and situations like this stop happening.

Now, some people may argue back that Christians aren’t confused at all and that people like Kim Davis are doing absolutely the right thing for “standing up to legalized evil” or something of that sort. Well…I would disagree.

Here’s the thing (and something that I’ve probably said a lot of times on this blog): there’s a grand difference between actually having religious liberty and using religious liberty as an excuse to be the god of your microcosm.

The problem is this: Kim Davis isn’t losing any of her own religious liberty. She has the right to believe whatever she wants and no one can tell her otherwise. She can refuse to attend an LGBT wedding. She can refuse to be friends with LGBT people. She can basically do whatever she wants in that sense. However, she cannot use religious liberty as an excuse to discriminate against people by refusing to do her job, which happens to be that of a county clerk (or whatever the official title of that position is). That would actually fall under the category of imposing on their religious liberty by attempting to force her own religious beliefs on them. Just because she believes that same-sex couples shouldn’t get married doesn’t mean she’s allowed to use her government job to prevent them from doing so, and that’s why she’s currently facing prison time.

Regardless of whatever side you may take on this, (hopefully) I think everyone can agree that the situation is complicated. So let me say this: in my ideal world, Kim Davis wouldn’t go to prison for this, and I’m sorry if that angers any LGBT people. I just don’t. Rather, I think that this could be used as a learning experience for all Christians, and especially for those who still aren’t sure how they’re supposed to navigate these types of situations. My reasoning for this is that I’m sort of viewing ultra conservative Christians as children who don’t know any better in this sense, and I’m sorry if that angers any of those people.

Again, the problem here is that some Christians are acting a little like spoiled kids, and again I’m not hating on Christians, I promise. I am one, and I’m proud to be, but I think that the vast majority of conservative Christians aren’t quite used to not getting what they want in terms of laws and legal arrangements. Thus, like any child, they start to lash out, crying that the system isn’t fair and that they’re being persecuted, just because they haven’t yet learned how to live in a world where they don’t get everything that they want. I understand that my analogy might sound a little derogatory, and again, I’m sorry about that, but it does seem pretty apt for the situation, doesn’t it?

What people need to learn is this: you can disagree with people and stick to your own beliefs without creating a scene or throwing a fit (which refusing to do your job fits into in this analogy). The world is changing, and we need to learn how to adapt to it in order to keep up and stay relevant.

But let me be clear here: for those who aren’t going to be shaken in what they believe, that’s totally fine. You may continue to believe whatever you want. I’m not arguing for relativism. In this case, adapting means learning how to retain those beliefs while continuing to treat others with respect and dignity so that they don’t dismiss you as being some sort of backwards person who just believes in myths and stories instead of a real, powerful, loving God. That’s what I mean by adapting and staying relevant. It’s not at all a call to discard your beliefs just because the world doesn’t agree with you. It’s a call to behave and conduct yourself in such a way that people might not necessarily know that you disagree with them and in such a way that they might actually want to hear what you believe.

For example, some people choose to smoke even though it’s been scientifically proven that it’s bad for your body and leads to cancer in the long run. That’s just scientific fact. However, some people still choose to smoke. That doesn’t mean that those people are evil or bad; it just means that they’ve taken their American liberty and acted on it. Most people can continue to believe that smoking is bad for you and abstain from it without constantly reminding their friends, family, and acquaintances of that fact. Moreover, people can also work in stores and sell cigarettes to people even if they don’t smoke and continue to believe that it’s harmful to your body. Thus, their personal beliefs don’t affect the way they treat other people, and they can continue to treat those people with respect and dignity regardless of their decisions.

Though that comparison isn’t perfect, I think that it can be applicable to this situation as well. People can disagree and believe that same-sex marriage and same-sex relationships are wrong without discriminating against people and without compromising their own personal beliefs. Just like a non-smoking person selling cigarettes because it’s their job, people who don’t necessarily believe in same-sex marriage can still issue marriage licenses without having to feel like they personally endorse that union.

That kind of grace and tolerance/respect is my hope and prayer for the future, because we need to start learning how to adapt in these ways so that people will stop calling us bigoted and hateful and start seeing that we (hopefully) do love everyone unconditionally, regardless of our own personal beliefs, because again, that’s what we’re called to do, isn’t it? We’re not called to try and conform the world and the government to the Bible and its teachings, only ourselves. Our primary calling is to love.

So let me end with this.

I think that what Kim Davis did was wrong.

And I think that conservative Christians need to change some of their attitudes and actions in order to better serve and love people while we’re here on this earth.

But I also think that what she did doesn’t necessarily warrant jail time, at least in my own personal opinion.

And I also think that we’re (the church) in a transition period right now and that LGBT people and the rest of the world should have a little grace for us, just like we’re (LGBT people) asking for some grace from the church.

So that’s my take on this whole messy situation, and unfortunately, I don’t think that cases like this are going to stop popping up any time soon, at least in the near future. Like I’ve said a couple times in this post, we’re in a transition period right now, and times of change and transition are incredibly hard sometimes, let me tell you. But that doesn’t mean that you give up and stop. From what I’ve been learning this past year, I think that while these times might be some of the most uncomfortable and painful that we go through, in the end, they result in a lot of growth for all parties involved, growth that couldn’t have happened without going through all of those experiences.

So that’s what I’m hoping and praying for, that these times of trial and awkwardness for the church will lead to a time of renewal, revival, and nuance where we become relevant again and known for our love rather than for our political stances.

Calm Down; Religious Liberty is Intact & God Isn't Going to Judge America

Alright, alright. I need to get some things off my chest. As you may have gathered from the title of this post, I'm not very amused by the fact that conservatives everywhere are bellyaching about the fact that the church is being persecuted and that this is the beginning of the end for religious liberty in the United States of America. Honestly, there is absolutely no reason for all of those people to be getting thrown into a frenzy because of a new equality law. And no, this is not the beginning of a downward moral spiral for this nation. Sorry.As Cory notes in his piece on Bedlam, the main problem here is that the church just plain isn't used to not getting its way on things like this. I hesitate to use the word "lost" because it implies that there are sides, but frankly, the church "lost" a battle that it thought it needed to win. So now, there are all these people claiming that God is going to judge our country and judge us for allowing these terrible morals into the legal system.

The only thing is that guarding the legal system was never the job of Christians. Our job is not to keep the government in check, making sure that it only passes laws that we approve of. Our job is not to impose our own religious beliefs on the entire nation. That is what will cause the downfall of religious liberty.

Because do you know what that sounds like? I'm not saying anything bad about Muslims, because we are called to love them unconditionally as well, but that sounds like the situation in a lot of Middle Eastern countries that most Christians would not approve of. There, Muslim religious and moral laws are imposed on everyone, regardless of whether they follow Islam or not. Most people agree that isn't right, so why is it any different here? The answer is that it isn't.

Also, it is my personal belief that any Christian who says that God is going to judge our country for allowing this law to be passed should stop. Why? Because it's just not true. I wholeheartedly believe that.

The reason for that is twofold.

First of all, I just do not believe that God consciously judges individual countries or people groups in the present day. I believe that ended in the Old Testament. And the reason I believe that is because God has opened His arms to all nations of the world. He wants there to be Christians from every nation and every people group. Believers no longer come from one single nation, and sorry to break it to anyone, but the United States is not the epicenter of Christianity. It just isn't. God's plan doesn't revolve around the United States, so it just doesn't make any sense whatsoever for Him to judge this country just because we happened to pass a law that a lot of people happen to disagree with.

Second, I believe that the fact that this country exists presently is also a sign that God isn't going to judge us simply for passing a marriage equality law. In case you didn't know, the United States has a pretty messy history. We aren't the white saviors of the world like some people might like to believe.

To start off, this country basically exists because several different European countries systematically committed genocide of the countless Native American groups that occupied the Western Hemisphere for years before they arrived. Those people were made in the image of God.

Next, this country allowed people to be enslaved and treated as property all because of the color of their skin. They were persecuted and treated as less than human because of their outward appearance. Those people were made in the image of God.

Then, women weren't allowed to vote or participate in the governmental sphere because they were deemed to be less intelligent and inferior to men. People thought that they wouldn't be able to handle it. That was less than 100 years ago. Those people were made in the image of God.

Having said all of that, I think that if God has allowed our country to remain standing after genocides, enslavements, and treating other people as if they are less than human for one reason or another, I wholeheartedly believe that our country will be fine after simply passing a law that gives everyone equal legal rights as everyone else.

So today, another group of people is being treated as fully human, meanwhile, anyone is still perfectly free to disagree with us, so religious liberties are still intact. And this is great, because we are made in the image of God too.

That's my take on the status of America.

Good day.

Thoughts & Musings on the SCOTUS Ruling

Today there are people who are rejoicing. And today there are also people who will be protesting. Today there are people who are crying tears of relief. And today there are also people who will be gritting their teeth and digging their heels into the ground.

Today there are people who believe that this is a time of revolutionary positive change. And there are also people who will be claiming that this is the beginning of a downward spiral for the United States.

All of this because the United States Supreme Court just ruled that they have found a constitutional right to marriage equality in this country.

Even though this is a landmark occasion for LGBT people, including a vast number of LGBT Christians, I can’t help but find myself taking the pessimist’s side, my first thoughts being: this isn’t over yet. Yes, granting legal status to countless people is a great thing, but unfortunately, it doesn’t change the majority of attitudes toward LGBT people, especially from religious communities. If anything, this ruling might only make that situation worse. After all, there are already church groups who have declared that they will fight the government on this issue, because they still believe it to be sin.

Thus, I believe that this is another opportunity for Christians to correct their past mistakes and begin showing unconditional love, regardless of what your beliefs on this topic are. Personally, I don’t mind if people still disagree with me on this. That’s completely fine. You hold to your beliefs, and I will hold to mine. What matters to me is how you treat people. Because the fact of the matter is that while this ruling might provide some measure of legal protections for LGBT people, it doesn’t and can’t change the way that others treat LGBT people, especially conservative Christians.

After all, if we don't start changing the way that we interact with LGBT people now, we’re going to push an entire community away from Jesus because of our own personal opinions and agendas. If Christians are supposed to be the reflection of Jesus, what kind of Jesus is the world going to see moving forward from today? Are they going to see a Jesus that demands perfection before they can accepted or are they going to see a Jesus that invites them to come as they are, saying that the rest can wait until later?

This isn’t just a pivotal moment for the LGBT community, this is a pivotal moment for the church as well. How the church responds in the next few weeks, months, or years will decide whether the church is viewed as the archenemy of LGBT people or whether it is slowly transformed into a place that is safe for everyone, regardless of what kind of “lifestyle” or background you have. And isn’t that what the church is supposed to be anyway? I once read a quote that said: the church is supposed to be a hospital for sinners, not a country club for saints. I think we need to take a good look at the church and decide which of the two we are and which of the two we want to be moving forward.

Are we going to be the kind of church that welcomes everyone as they are, for real? Or are we going to be the kind of church with religious bouncers at the door, ensuring that everyone entering is holy enough and clean enough to be inside?

So, today I’m glad for everyone who can finally get married. I’m glad that strides are being made in a direction where LGBT people won’t be seen as inferior or second class citizens. However, I’m also nervous for how this decision will impact the church. Some Christians will likewise be rejoicing. Some may be hardened even more in their beliefs that this is wrong. And some may not be sure anymore.

Regardless of where people find themselves beginning today, grace and unconditional love are what I implore everyone to remember, both for those who do not agree with the Supreme Court decision toward LGBT people and also for LGBT people toward those who do not agree with them. I mean, it would be pretty hypocritical to call them to love us when they don’t agree with us if we don’t purpose to do the same thing, right?

So yeah. A 5-4 ruling. That happened.

Let’s see what happens starting now.

A lot of things are about to change.